Castles & Manor Houses

Castles & Manor Houses

Castles & Manor Houses

Castles & Manor Houses

The manors in the Odder area are not open to the public, but they have plenty to tell nevertheless.

At the Gyllingnæs Manor, for example, its English owners during the 19th century were said to have had pursued careers in piracy in their past.

The distinguished lady at the Åkjær Manor during the 17th century not only insisted on being buried in a silk gown with neat silk stockings were to be changed every year at Christmas!

At Rathlousdal, the Lord of the Manor was buried in 1681 when he died after being attacked by a sudden indisposition. 150 years later during a renovation of his grave, a deformed body was found – it would seem that the unfortunate lord of the manor had in fact only appeared to be dead and was actually buried alive!

About Rodstenseje Manor it is said that a severe housekeeper sent her destitute sister and her many children away by these words: “be gone from the manor with your pigs!”. Shortly after the housekeeper herself gave birth to two “pigs”, and the bodies of all three were exhibited in the Odder Church as an awful warning.

When Hans Christian Andersen visited Gersdorffslund Manor in 1853, his reaction to all this could well have been: “It’s perfectly true”.

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