Odder manor houses are sturdy structures

Photo: Gert Kjeldal

There are many exciting stories about the Odder manor houses and they are just waiting to be heard. Take an exciting trip back in time.

Greatness and wealth in the countryside

Beautiful manor houses are scattered across the Odder vicinity like pearls on a string. These buildings are symbols of the agricultural area of the olden days when the good conditions for cultivating the land attracted and created wealthy landowners. Their wealth, power and vast properties have been instrumental in shaping the Odder area into what it is today.

The manor houses are now privately owned and not open to the public. But, of course, that does not make them any less interesting.

If you see them on your way, we can definitely recommend that you consider the beautiful buildings from a distance. With this guide in hand you can get to know them better.

Åkjær Manor

Åkjær Manor is one of the largest manors in Jutland located south of Odder between the villages of Hundslund and Ørting. 

Did you know that the lady of Åkjær Gods in the 18th century did not merely want to be buried in a silk dress wearing neat silk stockings but, also, that the stockings had to be replaced every year for Christmas?

Rathlousdal

The manor is situated just west of Odder, where a beautiful avenue of lime trees lead to the estate. The manor was established in 1674 and was in the period 1771-1800 owned by the then prime minister Joachim Otto Schack-Rathlou.

At Rathlousdal the lord of the manor was buried in 1681, after dying from a sudden illness. During a restoration of his tomb 150 years later, a distorted body was found - it turned out that the lord of the manor had been in a state of suspended animation and had been buried alive!
At Rathlousdal you can see an old bear grotto in the forest to the west of the manor house. The grotto dates from the 19th century and was home to Russian bears once when there was a small zoo in the forest.

Gyllingnæs Manor

The youngest of the manors in the district was established in 1801 by the Englishman John Smith.

Gyllingnæs Gods was built in the 19th century by English immigrants who were said to have been pirates in the past.

Gersdorffslund

Margrethe Gersdorff built this manor farm in 1672 near Hou.  

Until 1925, Gersdorffslund were owned by the people also owning Rathlousdal. However, the Rathlousdal family chose to sell Gersdorffslund.
A few hundred meters away is the well-preserved rampart Bjørnkær which is the remains of a fortress dating from the 13th century.

Rodsteenseje

The manor Hovedstrup (later Rodsteenseje) was first mentioned in the early 14th century and remained privately owned until 1481 where it became a part of the royal Åkjær Manor.

About Rodstenseje a tale is told of a tough housekeeper who sent her poor sister and her many children away with the words: "You must get out of the yard with your pigs!". Shortly afterwards, the housekeeper herself gave birth to two pigs and their three corpses were put on display in Odder Sognekirke as an awful warning.
Rodsteenseje is one of many farms in the Odder area, which was given to Joachim Gersdorff, Royal Steward, by the Danish crown after he had to waive his claim to land in Skania after the defeat of the First and Second Karl Gustav War.

Uldrupgård

Uldrupgård was built at the beginning of the 19th century and the building style is very destinctive; low walls and a high straw roof. The farm belongs to the Åkjær estate and was originally used for sheep rearing.

Uldrupgård has been awarded a diploma by the European conservation organisation Europa Nostra for impressive restoration work carried out on the preservation-worthy and distinctive building.
Uldrupgård is also known as Schäfergården which means farm built for sheep breeding. The lord at Åkjær Gods built the farm in 1800.
The farm is located in the beautiful Sondrup/Uldrup Bakker leading down towards Horsens Fjord which is perfect for day trips in nature.